The Cowboy Trail (with its open segments) sounds interesting.

Sometimes I miss Pittsburgh.

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The Walnut Street Equivalent.

For all you Pittsburghers listening in (or just those who know Pittsburgh well enough), you’ll recall that there is a bustling little street called Walnut, in the heart of Shadyside. Walnut Street is full of brand-name stores (and a few boutiques as well), cherubic toddlers and their parents, sweatshirted college students, and the occasional busker.

Well, today I have found San Francisco’s equivalent of Walnut Street. Appropriately (and eerily!) also named after a nut, the winner is Chestnut Street. The most relevant parts span from Divisadero to Fillmore St.

A few of the places that are exactly the same on BOTH streets: Sunglass Hut, GNC, Apple Store, Starbucks, Gap, Williams Sonoma.

Other interesting finds: both have a mix of well-known clothing stores and little boutiques, small coffee shops (Pittsburgh’s Coffee Tree Roasters and San Francisco’s Coffee Roastery), a mix of restaurants, from Italian to Asian fusion, quaint¬†delicatessens…the list could go on and on. But then we’d be approaching Twilight Zone, and we wouldn’t want that, now would we?

It’s not like Carnegie Mellon’s 2011 Open Studio Day, IDKSRY ūüėČ isn’t getting enough press…but it can always use a little more, right? Support your favorite hipsters (number 9 in the nation!) and stop by the College of Fine Arts tomorrow (Friday, Dec. 9), 5-9PM.

Free. Open to the public. Studio Tour & Art Sale, 5-9pm. Reception, 7pm.

And if Switchboard is talking about, you know it’s cool!¬†

Because why wouldn’t you want a restaurant in the middle of Schenley Plaza? I peeked in brand-new¬†The Porch¬†with my friend¬†Molly the other day, and just ogled the smooth finishings and airy windows. Their menu looks solid but be warned—this is no grab & go cafeteria style, place (it’s sit-down).

I am a creature of the real world, even / though you think I seldom choose to live there / properly.

“In a Landlocked Time,” a poem by Pittsburgh native¬†Lucie Brock-Broido,¬†from her 1988 collection A Hunger